Origin of English word SOLILOQUY

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The word SOLILOQUY is addressed in the entry: CALL


English Word

CALL

Edenic Word

QOAL

Hebrew Word

קול

Transliteration

Koof-Vav-Lamed

Pronounciation

COAL

Conversion

[ QL]

Meaning

A sound or summons

Roots

A call is a loud utterance or signal. קול    QOAL (voice, sound) might better be rendered as signal or CRY in Exodus19:19 when the "voice" of the ram's horn blares.  A companion, guttural-liquid term, shifting liquids from ל  Lamed/L  to Resh/R, is קרא QaRAh is to cry out, annouce or read  – see CRY.   It appears with  קול   QOAL in many verses such as Isaiah40:3 - "The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness" - קול   QOAL.

Old Icelandic kaller is to call or cry; the Indo-European base gal means to scream or shriek. Two relevant Indo-European “root”s and their deriva­tives follow.  Reversing Lamed-Koof brings in various “language” words at LICK.


Branches

1) gal (to call, shout). CALL, CLATTER. 2) kel (to shout). ACCLAIM, CALENDAR, CLAIM, CLAIRVOYANCE, CLAMOR, CLASS, CLEAR, CONCILIATE, COUNCIL, DECLAIM, DECLARE, ECCLESIA(STES), ECLAIR, EXCLAIM, HALE, LOW, NOMENCLATURE, PROCLAIM, and RECLAIM.

CLAMOR does make a better translation for QOAL in Exodus32:17- the "noise" or "cry" of war in the camp as heard from afar.

The CALLING in "name calling" best suits the Koof-Resh/QR wordtranslated "appoint" in Numbers35:11

Many H words come from K etymons, so that HAIL, HALLOO, HELLO and HOLLER may belong here as well – see  HAIL.

To CURSE is to CALL down evil upon someone. If CURSE isn't from  G’a[A[hR (rebuke, threaten — Isaiah 17:13 -- S-G), it may be from QaLeL (curse) - which is the opposite of HaLeL (to praise, HAIL, say HALLELUJAH). קלס Qee Lai$ is to praise in Post Biblical Hebrew; קלס QeeLai$ in Jeremiah 20:8 is the opposite, mockery, scorn and threaten. Polish klac (curse) recalls   קלס QeeLai$ (curse).   This guttural-liquid-fricative term of scornful threat is nearly identical in meaning to CURSE – and CURSE has no Indo-European “root.”

Other terms for "voice"  are from QOAL (voice – see CALL). They  include golos in Russian, hlas in Czech and koe in Japanese (which has typically dropped an end-liquid, the  "L”). Noise, another meaning of  QOAL, is halas in Polish. The common Koof/Q  shifting to H principle is evident, keeping in mind that graphically and audibly the Koof/Q is an extended Hey/H.

ECLAT (from the French term for "noise" or "clap") may be influenced by QOALOAT (thunder). "Call" is kalu in Australian Aborigine. See CRY.

From Genesis 27:22 on, with the “voice” or speech of Jacob that Isaac heard, any guttural-liquid might echo the Edenic Qoof-Vav-Lamed.

Other liquid-guttural speaking terms include LaK[H](aSH)  and RaK[H](ASH)  (to whisper),    [E]eLaiG (to stammer--  Isaiah 32;4)”, LaGHaZ (to slander; speak a foreign tongue), RaK([H]eL) (to slander), La’[E]G (to mock, laugh at, see LAUGH — Psalms 22:8), La’[A]G (stammering speech – Isaiah 28:11) and LiGLaiG (to mock).

BELIE, LIE and WARLOCK  are attributed to the Indo-European “root” leugh (to tell a lie).

Under various Indo-European “root”s you'll find derivatives of Greek legein (to say, speak) and Latin loqui (to speak) such as DIALOGUE, ELOCUTION, ELOQUENT, LECTURE, LEXICAL, LEXICOGRAPHER and LOQUACIOUS.

LANGUAGE, LINGO and LINGUISTICS may be nasalized (added N) L-G words; the AHD files them under Indo-European “root” dnghu (tongue). LOQUTION, CIRCUMLOCUTION, COLLOQUIUM, GRANDILOQUENCE, INTERLOCUTION, MAGNILOQUENT,  SOLILOQUY and VENTRILOQUISM have been placed at Indo-European “root” tolk(w)  (to speak). Like the speaking roots leg and loqui, they are likely reversals of QoaL, voice – see CALL.  Uluka is wailing in Basque; kieli is language in Finnish; lyak is to cry in Tagalog.

  For LK language words – see LICK.            


Related Words

LAUGH



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